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Anaphylaxis

April 04, 2016

ANAPHYLAXIS

Anaphylaxis is a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. It can occur within seconds or minutes of exposure to something you're allergic to, such as a peanut or the venom from a bee sting.

The flood of chemicals released by your immune system during anaphylaxis can cause you to go into shock; your blood pressure drops suddenly and your airways narrow, blocking normal breathing. Signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis include a rapid, weak pulse, a skin rash, and nausea and vomiting. Common triggers of anaphylaxis include certain foods, some medications, insect venom and latex.

Anaphylaxis requires an immediate trip to the emergency department and an injection of epinephrine. If anaphylaxis isn't treated right away, it can lead to unconsciousness or even death.

Texas State Law allows prescription anaphylaxis medicine to be stored with authorized school personnel if:

  1. The prescription anaphylaxis medicine has been prescribed for the student as indicataed by the prescription label on the medicine;
  2. A written authorization, signed by the parent, for the medicine to be administered by school personnel.
  3. Click here to print a parent authorization form - http://s3.amazonaws.com/scschoolfiles/81/medication_parent_request.docx

Texas State Law allows a student to possess and self-administer prescription anaphylaxis medicine while on school property if:

  1. The prescription anaphylaxis medicine has been prescribed for the student as indicated by the prescription label on the medicine;
  2. The student has demonstrated to the student’s physician or other licensed health care provider and the school nurse, if available, the skill level necessary to self-administer the prescription medication, including the use of any device required to administer the medication;
  3. The self-administration is done in compliance with the prescription or written instructions from the student’s physician or other licensed health care provider;
  4. A parent/guardian of the student provides to the school:
    1. Written authorization, signed by the parent, for the student to self-administer the prescription medicine while on school property or at a school-related event or activity; and
    2. A written statement, signed by the student’s physician or other licensed health care provider that states:
      1. That the student is at risk for anaphylaxis and is capable of self-administering the prescription medicine;
      2. The name and purpose of the medicine;
      3. The prescribed dosage for the medicine;
      4. The times at which or circumstances under which the medicine may be administered; and
      5. The period for which the medicine is prescribed.

Click here if your child has prescription anaphylaxis medicine needs to carry it - http://s3.amazonaws.com/scschoolfiles/81/anaphylaxis.docx

Clink here to view information on anaphylaxis prevention and how to use an EpiPen -http://www.epipen.com/howtouse_high.aspx

 
 

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